Caithness Map :: Links to Site Map Great value Unlimited Broadband from an award winning provider  

 

More Questions Asked On Chronic Pain Delays At Nhs Highland

12th February 2020

Highlands and Islands Labour MSP, David Stewart, has tabled more questions in the Scottish Parliament in his bid to see waiting times improved at NHS Highland's chronic pain clinic.



Mr Stewart, who is also Labour’s Shadow Health Minister, was approached by constituents who complained about the waiting times for first appointments in the north, advising that in some cases there can also be more than a year's wait for follow up appointments.



NHS Highland acknowledged an increased demand for the service, the lengthy waiting times patients in the north have to wait to be seen and also advised that there is a significant shortage of consultants in chronic pain nationally. They have also cited the ageing population and an increase in the numbers of people living with long term conditions as contributing factors.



Mr Stewart said "I contacted the Cabinet Secretary for Health, Jeane Freeman, but she failed to answer how the Scottish Government is going to address the national shortage of consultants.



“I understand other NHS boards have also cited workforce shortages as a contributing factor to lengthening waiting times for chronic pain services in Scotland. Findings of a 2017 Facilities Planning Model Census found there were a similar ratio of chronic pain doctors (anaesthetists) in Scotland in 2017 compared to 2011, equivalent to 1/100,000 people, which highlighted that more were needed.



“Meanwhile constituents try to cope as best they can with excruciating pain or have to pay for private treatment. This has to be addressed.



“I have tabled more PQs (Parliamentary Questions) asking how many chronic pain doctors are in training. I’ve also asked how the £703m as yet unallocated to drive down waiting times is to be allocated between Scotland’s health boards. Of the £119m that was allocated this year, only £7.5m came to NHS Highland and how much of that was actually directed to chronic pain is not clear." he continued.

“The idea of waiting a year to get help while in severe pain is horrific, it often stops people being able to work and affects their home lives immeasurably. We need to see the Scottish Government commit more to reduce these unacceptably long delays.”

Parliamentary Questions tabled by David Stewart are detailed below:-

Question S5W-27291: David Stewart, Highlands and Islands, Scottish Labour, Date Lodged: 04/02/2020

To ask the Scottish Government what the (a) longest and (b) shortest wait time for chronic pain treatment has been in each year since 2017.

Current Status: Expected Answer date 03/03/2020

Question S5W-27290: David Stewart, Highlands and Islands, Scottish Labour, Date Lodged: 04/02/2020

To ask the Scottish Government how the remaining £703 million of Waiting Times Improvement Plan funding will be allocated in 2020-21, also broken down by NHS board.

Current Status: Expected Answer date 03/03/2020

Question S5W-27288: David Stewart, Highlands and Islands, Scottish Labour, Date Lodged: 04/02/2020

To ask the Scottish Government how many chronic pain doctors have been in training in each year since 2017, including to date in 2020.

Current Status: Expected Answer date 03/03/2020

Question S5W-27289: David Stewart, Highlands and Islands, Scottish Labour, Date Lodged: 04/02/2020

To ask the Scottish Government how much of the Waiting Times Improvement Plan funding was allocated to chronic pain services in 2019-20.

Current Status: Expected Answer date 03/03/2020

[Printer Friendly Version]